Long term care and reverse mortgage

Laurie MacNaughton © 2019

Ever thought about immortality? Judging by the sundries left behind by our earliest ancestors, it appears humans have always been hot pursuit of an aging cure. And though we may no longer send exploration parties to find the Fountain of Youth, every year billions of dollars are spent on ways to slow aging, and even more dollars are spent on researching aging-related diseases. But as of publication of this column…still no eternal-life pill on the horizon.  

And this means the following: unless we drop dead, many of us will experience the aging process – and significant long-term care costs.

This fact is not lost on most of us, and it leads us to consider long term care insurance. These policies cover the cost of in-home care or assisted living, typically for a defined number of years.

For some aging homeowners the fear – or risk – is that they will purchase a policy they will never need. And because these policies ain’t cheap, this fear is understandable. However, over the past few years long-term care/life-insurance “hybrid” policies have entered the market. These largely eliminate the financial risk of some older long-term care options.

Here’s how they work: if you don’t end up needing the full payout for your long-term care, the insurance company pays your beneficiary a benefit when you die.

Some policies are paid through monthly or annual payments, while others are paid in one lump sum – one hefty lump sum. But more about that in a minute.

There is a mind-blowing array of options, and as I am not an insurance agent, nor do I carry any insurance licenses, I will not attempt to lay out either the various products or their merits. I do have a list of highly-qualified, local professionals if you’d like to explore your options.

I can, however, definitively say this: increasingly calls come into my office both from homeowners and from homeowners’ financial advisors who are exploring ways to fund long-term care insurance. And more and more frequently they are turning to a reverse mortgage as a means of covering premiums.

Why? It’s simple. A long-term care policy creates a bucket of money that contains many times the dollar amount paid in. But as I mentioned, a policy can be pricey.

A reverse mortgage, which is a home equity loan much like any other, can provide funds for a long-term care policy without saddling the homeowner with a monthly mortgage payment. Because a reverse mortgage is a loan, it will be repaid – but not until the last person on title permanently leaves the home. At that point the heirs either sell the home or repay the debt and keep the home.

Many years ago I mindlessly said to a client, “Getting old is hard.” He replied, “No, getting old is easy. Paying for it is hard.”

Touché. Finances are the hard part.

There is never a one-size-fits-all financial product – including long-term care insurance or a reverse mortgage. Financial needs vary and every homeowner’s circumstances are a bit different.

But this much is certain: none of us is likely to get by on just our Social Security. Few will survive on just an IRA, a 401(k), or pension – or, for that matter, on a reverse mortgage. However, a reverse mortgage often plays a very important role in asset longevity, and when added to other resources can contribute to long-term financial health in the retirement years.

If you would like to discuss your financial needs, or those of a loved one, give me a call. I always love hearing from you.

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